Feeding a Conference’s Brain Power

If you have never run an event before, it may surprise you what the highest cost of running most events are. It’s not the venue, and (unless you are bringing in a lot of overseas speakers) it’s not the travel. No, for most conferences, it’s going to be one thing that most people will need and complain about the most: the food.

Food, or catering if you want to be all sophisticated about it, is typically the largest budget line item for any conference. This is why most events of any size either charge a large registration fee or, in lieu of a fee, let people fend for themselves.

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Community Event Success Lies with, Well, Community

The origin of DevConf is a lot like how many open source applications get started: something that starts as something one or a few people might find useful, but then growing into something much larger and widely known. But its humble origins belie the impact of the DevConf event: with three national-level events in the U.S, India, and original Czech Republic that thousands of participants from around the world attend every year.

Not bad for a conference that got started as an internal meeting. You know the kind: the semi-regular get-together where you sit through presentations on what everyone else in the office is doing at that moment. In 2008, the Red Hat Czech offices had about 25 developers who did not have a clear picture of what everyone else was working on. Except rather than being a mind-numbing exercise of status reports, the one-day event was a constructive enterprise of collaboration and cross-pollination across different projects.

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Celebrating 20 Years of the Apache Software Foundation

This past March, the Apache Software Foundation celebrated a significant milestone in its history: 20 years as a preeminent organization in the world of open source software.

Back in San Francisco in 1999, the original 21 founders, including members of the Apache Group (creators of the Apache HTTP Server) formed The Apache Software Foundation. The Apache HTTP Server project continues to be one of the best known of the ASF’s 350 projects, with 80 million Websites being served by this platform. Continue reading

Celebrating Software Freedom Day 2019

Software Freedom Day logoSeptember 21 is a significant day for those of us who work and play in the world of free and open source software (FLOSS). Software Freedom Day, a global celebration of FLOSS falls on this date!

It is always pretty amazing: the choice to share software and see it built freely for its own sake has influenced innovation within IT for over three decades. Technologies like cloud computing, big data, containers… these all were successful not in spite of FLOSS, but because of it.

Out commitment to free software has never wavered at Red Hat. It is ingrained in the very fabric of our culture, and we enjoy celebrating this fact every day.

We hope you can take some time today to mark the occasion, and enjoy the successes and relationships you have made while working with free software. I know we are!

 

 

Community Impact with Local Meetups

In order to increase the community outreach of Red Hat in Brno I, together with Jakub Čecháček, decided to organize a meetup that would bring together a community of people with a common interest in open source and cutting edge technologies in the enterprise software world.

Our goal is to bring the latest open source libraries, frameworks, and projects closer to technology enthusiasts. This meetup is aimed at all kinds of audiences, including software and quality engineers, architects, product managers, and evangelists. Continue reading

Happy Birthday CentOS!

Today, CentOS turns 15 years old. It’s had hard times and good times, and gone through a number of big changes over those years. We feel that we’ve landed in a really great place over the last five years, as part of the Red Hat family of projects, and we’re very excited about what’s coming with CentOS 8, and the years to come.

Right now, we want to look back at how we got where we are now. We did that by going back and talking with some of the people that were involved in those early years, as well as some that joined the project later on. Continue reading

Three Tips for Running a FOSDEM DevRoom (Or any Single-Track Event)

(With Leslie Hawthorn)

For the past three years, we’ve run the FOSDEM Community DevRoom, welcoming speakers from the ranks of open source maintainers, community builders, FOSS non-profit organizations, and agile coaching. We’ve also been fortunate enough to get great reviews on our program curation and DevRoom facilitation, so we’re sharing a few tips to help people who’d like to run a DevRoom at FOSDEM.

This list isn’t just for FOSDEMers, though; it’s good for anyone who needs some getting-started advice on running a single-track program at any event!

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Building Snakes to Learn Code

On Saturday, February 2, Red Hat Brno hosted a “Snake workshop” for PyLadies CZ.

Before I begin describing the event, let me first write a bit about the concept.

PyLadies CZ is an informal group of people that (among other things) organize three-month Python courses for women (mostly beginners). These courses have been going on for about five years in Brno, and have heavily influenced the workshop.

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Event Report: Linux.conf.au 2019, Part 1

I’m often asked about the timing of linux.conf.au as it generally occurs during January, or early February, when a lot of people in Australia and New Zealand are taking a summer break. My response is that the timing is perfect as it provides a much needed mental jump start at the beginning of the year, and always leaves me excited about the amazing things happening within our Open Source community.

The 2019 linux.conf.au in Christchurch NZ, I’m very pleased to say, did not disappoint in this context. It easily stands as one of the best conferences I’ve been to in the last 10+ years, and I already can’t wait for next year’s conference in the Gold Coast of Australia. In addition Red Hat continues to sponsor the conference each year, and several colleagues had speaker slots.

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