Celebrating 20 Years of the Apache Software Foundation

This past March, the Apache Software Foundation celebrated a significant milestone in its history: 20 years as a preeminent organization in the world of open source software.

Back in San Francisco in 1999, the original 21 founders, including members of the Apache Group (creators of the Apache HTTP Server) formed The Apache Software Foundation. The Apache HTTP Server project continues to be one of the best known of the ASF’s 350 projects, with 80 million Websites being served by this platform. Continue reading

The View from KiwiPyCon – X

The New Zealand Python User Group ran the  tenth national Python conference in New Zealand last week.  Kiwi PyCon is aimed at promoting and educating people about the Python programming language.  Included as speakers and attendees are some big names from the global python and developer community who travel to New Zealand annually for the conference including Red Hat’s own Graham Dumpleton who delivered a talk on building interactive learning environments using Jupyterhub. Continue reading

Licenses Are Not Business Models

Fedora shaded cupcakesThere has been a lot of discussion about the relationship between open source and business of late. The rise of “hybrid licenses” designed to prevent mega-users like cloud providers from mass distributing and supporting open source software, thus depriving the software’s stewarding vendors of potential revenue, has generated a lot of content.

A personal favorite of mine is my colleague Tom Callaway’s May 4 “cupcake” Twitter thread, where delicious confectioneries are used to explain how these new licenses are supposed to work and why the open source community at large are up in arms about these new approaches. Continue reading

Celebrating Software Freedom Day 2019

Software Freedom Day logoSeptember 21 is a significant day for those of us who work and play in the world of free and open source software (FLOSS). Software Freedom Day, a global celebration of FLOSS falls on this date!

It is always pretty amazing: the choice to share software and see it built freely for its own sake has influenced innovation within IT for over three decades. Technologies like cloud computing, big data, containers… these all were successful not in spite of FLOSS, but because of it.

Out commitment to free software has never wavered at Red Hat. It is ingrained in the very fabric of our culture, and we enjoy celebrating this fact every day.

We hope you can take some time today to mark the occasion, and enjoy the successes and relationships you have made while working with free software. I know we are!

 

 

IBM + Red Hat FAQ for Communities

Chris WrightWe know you may have questions about what the new IBM and Red Hat relationship means for Red Hat’s participation in open source projects. The short answer is nothing, but we’ve gathered a few specific questions below that you may have. In addition, I will host an online Q&A session in the coming days where you can ask questions you may have about what the acquisition means for Red Hat and our involvement in open source communities. Details will be announced on the Red Hat Blog. Continue reading

Happy Birthday CentOS!

Today, CentOS turns 15 years old. It’s had hard times and good times, and gone through a number of big changes over those years. We feel that we’ve landed in a really great place over the last five years, as part of the Red Hat family of projects, and we’re very excited about what’s coming with CentOS 8, and the years to come.

Right now, we want to look back at how we got where we are now. We did that by going back and talking with some of the people that were involved in those early years, as well as some that joined the project later on. Continue reading

Five Surprising Things When Open Sourcing Proprietary Software

When a piece of proprietary software that has been developed for a few years is being open sourced, there is often a perception in the engineering world that it should be quick and painless. After all, what’s involved besides picking a license and making the code repositories open?

Here are a few things that come up when moving from a proprietary to an open source development model for a project. Continue reading

Three Tips for Running a FOSDEM DevRoom (Or any Single-Track Event)

(With Leslie Hawthorn)

For the past three years, we’ve run the FOSDEM Community DevRoom, welcoming speakers from the ranks of open source maintainers, community builders, FOSS non-profit organizations, and agile coaching. We’ve also been fortunate enough to get great reviews on our program curation and DevRoom facilitation, so we’re sharing a few tips to help people who’d like to run a DevRoom at FOSDEM.

This list isn’t just for FOSDEMers, though; it’s good for anyone who needs some getting-started advice on running a single-track program at any event!

Continue reading

Balancing Open and Productivity

The adage “knowledge is power” is usually a very good one. After all, the more you know about what’s going on, the more you can usually make a better decision about the things you need to get done.

In an open, collaborative environment, methods such as more transparent processes can lead to more efficient knowledge sharing. which in turn can lead to more effective decisions and outcomes.

But such systems also have people involved, and when that happens, sometimes the most ideal open framework can be thwarted from its intended goals.

Continue reading