Community News

Community Managers, What Do They Do?

community Communities are an important part of Red Hat culture and as we have many community managers here, I think it is worth sharing my community management research output with you.

Why did I do this research? We can look at our PnT Comms team as serving an internal community by creating content and events that openly exchange knowledge and ideas about PnT's strategy, products, and people. All PnT associates could be called part of our community, which is the ideal world towards which we're heading. This is why Tim Hildred asked me to find answers to these four questions:

  • Who is a community manager?
  • What are the main areas of responsibility of a community manager?
  • What are some things that community managers, both internal and external, do to achieve those things? How can we apply them in PnT Comms?
  • How do we measure the success of a community?

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Ethics In Open Source

paperclips One of the advantages of traveling to open source conferences around the world is that you get a varied perspectives on how the world can work that falls outside your own worldview.

My recent trip to the Open Source Summit in Prague afforded me many such opportunities, and from very unexpected sources. One of which was from what some of my colleagues informed me was a insidious time waster: Universal Paperclips.

And the fun was just beginning.

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The End of FUD? Sadly, No

trashcan Linux. git. Hadoop. Filesystem storage. Block storage. Blockchain.

These are just some of the technologies and tools that have been created working with free and open source software (FOSS) methodologies. These tools have proven to be, time and time again, solid, stable, and commercially successful.

Yet, here we are, in 2017, still hearing arguments that FOSS licenses can introduce problems in your IT organization. Or comments from technology professionals who decry the value of open source, saying open source is never going to be truly innovative.

(See lede paragraph.)

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Stop Working So Hard--Scaling Open Source Community Practices

scaling tracks Lately, I have been revising some of the OpenStack community’s processes to make them more sustainable. As we grew over the last 7 years to have more than 2,000 individual contributors to the current release, some practices that worked when they were implemented have begun causing trouble for us now that our community is changing in different ways. My goal in reviewing those practices is to find ways to eliminate the challenges.

OpenStack is developed by a collection of project teams, most of which focus on a feature-related area, such as block storage or networking. The areas where we have most needed to change intersect with all of those teams, such as release management and documentation. Although the teams responsible for those tasks have tended to be small, their members have been active and dedicated. At times that dedication has masked the near-heroic level of effort they were making to keep up with the work load.

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On Humane Teams at Home and Around the World

Pivotal Meetup I had the pleasure last week of seeing Dan Young and Emma Jane Hogbin Westby's talk on Humane Teams at Home and Around the World at the Pivotal London Lunch meetup, and came away with a lot to think about: how different cities do meetups, the choices that we make about how we work with teams, and what information informs those choices.

It's always a delightful experience to see how different cities do different meetups. Even though it was the middle of the week and pouring down rain, over 60 people came to see the talk! The structure of the meetup is around topics interesting to tech, not necessarily the most technical deep dive. It's almost like a bite-sized DevOps Day feeling, in a really lovely space in the Pivotal office.

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In Search Of... Software Users

Searching When I was kid, there was a pretty cool documentary show called In Search Of…, which examined various paranormal (Bigfoot, The Bermuda Triangle) and natural (killer bees, hurricanes) phenomena and mysteries. This may seem dull for a pre-teen kid, but it was narrated by Leonard Nimoy, so I was pretty much all in.

One of the things this show (and others like it) does is avoid any real conclusions. Episodes paint a picture of many possibilities, present some counter arguments, then wrap up with a vague innocuous statement like "Is there really a Bigfoot? Only time may tell."

(Yeah, not really big on the mystery solving.)

As entertaining as this show is, it's not really the vague approach community team members want when trying to solve their greatest mystery: "Who is using our software?"

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Events Are Hard, And They May Be Getting Harder

Hallway Track Summer is always a busy time in tech conference season, especially for the Open Source and Standards team. In the past few weeks, we have had team members in Japan, China, and Germany. Other community teams are busy too—today AnsibleFest happened in London, and last week the oVirt team was busy helping out with PyCon Israel.

There's a little bit of a lull coming up, and several of us are taking breathers as we recover from the challenges of international travel. Right now, those challenges are fairly well-known: jet lag, language barriers, cultural differences… but there seems to be an uncertain future on the horizon, a future where travel may be potentially complicated by much greater forces, such as climate and geopolitical change.

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FLOSS--The Scary Monster?

Monster How welcoming is the Open Source community? And I’m talking about Linux specifically. I would like to tell you a little bit about my experiences in last year or so. I already touched on this topic at the end of my previous post, but I would like to fully explain the problem and hopefully spark some hope. I will be saying “you” a lot, but I may not mean you. Don’t take it personally please.

I’m a former game programmer, obviously closed-source industry. I’m also a .NET Engineer (yes that is my job title at Red Hat). I work on C# stuff in Linux, I work on the Open Source .NET Core.

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ManageIQ Fine GA - Automation with Ansible, Public Cloud Improvements, and more

ManageIQ Fine After several months of Fine work by the fine ManageIQ team and community, we're proud to present you the ManageIQ Fine release! This sixth ManageIQ release is named after American chess Grandmaster Reuben Fine.

Since the ManageIQ Euwe GA, we’ve had 10 very productive sprints with a total of 1511 pull requests in the main ManageIQ repository and 4880 PRs overall (averaging 76/244 pull requests per week).

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