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Red Hat Community News

Community Will Make Big Splash at Red Hat Summit

Summit logo As Red Hat preps for Red Hat Summit in the venerable Moscone Center next month, the Open Source and Standards team is preparing to be a strong presence at the event with our Community Central in the Main Expo Hall and a separate Open Source and Community track within the sessions.

The Community Central area will feature a lounge and plenty of space to interact with the Fedora and CentOS projects, which will anchor the space. But projects like RDO, Gluster, Ceph, oVirt, and Project Atomic will also have a home in Community Central, just to name a few.

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Hierarchy in Open Source

Governance in an open source community always varies from project to project. Typically it's along the lines of a meritocracy, where community members' participations are weighted by the quality of each respective member's contributions, but not always.

But one thing a community should not be is completely governed by the management hierarchy of any companies that sponsor that project.

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Open? Check. But Is Your Community Growing?

OSM logo There is much—legitimate, mind you—celebration of late about the continued success of open source within software development. But there are times when that success may not be enough, even when good-faith efforts are made.

It is one thing to have an open source software project and quite another to have a healthy and growing open source community. Even when a company or project is making legitimate and strong efforts to free and open source processes and values, it may not always hit the mark—especially when it comes to community.

There are quite a few software projects that we in the Open Source and Standards group work with, both on personal and professional levels, and one of the key differentiators that gives a community better growth is the presence of what we call "onboarding."

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Examining the TripleO UI

RDO logo One of the very first things I learned about OpenStack was just how difficult it was to install.

With so many components handling so much automation, installation and deployment of a cloud computing platform like OpenStack, it's no small feat to get it up and running.

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Open Branding for Open Source Projects

One of the really interesting things about working for Red Hat is the company's attention to detail. Everything about the way the company is presented to the world is decided upon. You can't just toss out any old picture of a guy in a red fedora… Shadowman's gotta have the exact look and feel. To help with that, there's an actual cool little branding book Red Hat's marketing department worked up that I use for lot of things: even camera angles on video interviews.

Such things are not just fun for the control freaks among us… consistency in the way things are presented help reduce friction and make it easier for any project–commercial or otherwise–to get their messaging out. The last thing you need is a lot of inconsistent look and feel in the materials you present to your community.

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RDO released packages for OpenStack Mitaka

The RDO community is pleased to announce the general availability of the RDO build for OpenStack Mitaka for RPM-based distributions - CentOS Linux 7 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. RDO is suitable for building private, public, and hybrid clouds and Mitaka is the 13th release from the OpenStack project, which is the work of more than 2500 contributors from around the world. (Source)

See Red Hat Stack for a brief overview of what's new in Mitaka.

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How I Became an Ambassador for Open Source

Fedora logo For years, I lived in a world of proprietary software. "Linux" and "open source" didn't even exist in my vocabulary, and my vision of the world was so narrow. It felt like I was living at the bottom of a well.

But when I started learning web development (specifically PHP) at the age of 13, I became aware of open source technologies like CentOS and Apache—but never really cared.

Fast forward five years: that's when things started to change.

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Only You Can Prevent Flame Wars

Smokey BearStop me if you've heard this one.

Open source project is licensed under License A, and someone comes along and requests/demands that License B be used instead. Conversation ensues, which soon becomes an all-out flame war, because Someone Is Wrong On the Internet.

It's a common enough occurrence that anyone who has interacted with the free and open source software (FOSS) communities for any length of time has surely witnessed it. Or perhaps even participated in such a flame war.

Just yesterday I saw a discussion on a bugtracker system for a project using an MIT license. The bug? Move the project to the GPL. The conversation unfolded pretty much as I described in the hypothetical described in the introductory paragraph, up to and including using a certain flamboyant U.S. politician as an updated representation of Godwin's Law.

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Parsing Technology: Software Collections and Containers

Software Collections logo Even working at Red Hat, it can be very challenging to keep up on all the latest technologies that permeate through our upstream projects and downstream products. No sooner than you can get your head wrapped around the notion of virtual datacenters vs. cloud computing, now all of a sudden you have to learn about containers. And don't even get me started on tools like Atomic App and Nulecule.

One of the things that's always bothered me a little bit about containers is that, on the surface, they seem to overlap a lot with the functionality of other technologies. When I hear someone talking about containerizing something like Fedora or openSUSE, it's pretty easy to think of containers as just fancy portable virtual machines—even though there is not a speck of hypervisor technology anywhere inside of container architecture. But from an initiate's point of view, it is easy to see how the overlapping functionalities can blur the perception between containers and virtual machines.

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Gluster Goes to FAST

Gluster logo We hosted a small meetup/birds of a feather session at USENIX’s FAST conference. FAST is a conference that focuses on File And Storage Technologies in Santa Clara, California.

Vijay Bellur, Gluster Project Lead, did a short talk on Gluster.Next, our ongoing architectural evolution in Gluster to improve scaling and enable new use cases like like storage as a service, storage for containers, and hyperconvergence.

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